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Monday, February 23, 2004

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Courtney

My sig other, as a professional writer, defines being a professional writer as writing and getting paid for it. Not getting paid for it, not professional. ;)

yasmín

My biggest fear about putting my writings on my blog is that someone might take them and claim them as their own. Not that this has happened yet, or for the matter, that it will. I've seen it happen, so I've hidden myself in my livejournal, which completely defeats the purpose of my domain and me.

I think for us 'would be writers' its very important that we use the median of the weblog, especially since they're so accessible. We do have pure control of our content, and don't have to worry about editors' suggestions.

Good luck on the Great American Novel. Persistance is a virtue, not a curse. At least that's what I heard before I choked the guy.

TPB, Esq.

Yeah. Jackie Collins is a professional writer as well. So, she's got that going for her. ;-)

To me it's not the title "professional" or "Author" (note the 'a') that really counts, largely because a lot of great writers never realized their works would be looked at as great writing (Pascal and Montaigne come to mind). To me, the idea that blogging could create a new literary medium, or revitalize the storytelling medium, is a really neat idea.

Yamsin, a story's not a story unless you let others hear/read/see it. Let us at it! :-)

TL Hines

Interesting, TPB. My feeling is: if you write, you're a writer. Pay is merely the cliched icing on the cake. And yes, within fiction circles, most people are encouraged to refrain from posting their stories on their blogs But perhaps there's a way to bridge the gap between the tradition of literary magazines and the immediacy of blogs. Do you know of anyone who runs a true literary magazine/blog hybrid? I think it could be interesting. I can almost envision a group blog, wherein writers submit fiction based on a chosen subject each month. Subject matter and contributors could change with each blog issue.

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